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This photograph was taken of George, with dogs, date unknown. 

 
       
 

A closer up view of the dogs on the left side of the picture (or to George's right).

 
   

 

 
 

A closer up view of the dogs on the other side of George (or to his left).

 

 

George holding a couple of dogs.

 
   

 

 
 

George taken the same day as the preceding image.

 
   

 

 
 

Another picture (George is on the right as you look at the image). Again, this picture was taken the same day as the above two. George appears older and a bit stockier in build compared to the first picture above.

 
   

 

 
 

The man on the left end is believed to be George Barcroft at an older age when compared to the above pictures. The dog next to him and the dog on the far right end appear to be Beardie-likes. Unfortunately, the picture faded over time.

 
   

 

 
 

If only we knew who they were.

 
   

 

 
 

Sylvia went (in the Spring of 2009) to view Scout Moor Bottom Farm where Jonathan and George had once lived.  She wrote:

"Scout Moor Bottom Farm which, to me, looks to have been a substantial building for the area was built on the only piece of flat land available from the easily obtained quarry stone. While sitting among the ruins, I had time to ponder: there was no way any wheels could have traversed that land. I wondered how George removed his furniture (when he moved to Edenfield), as the furniture would have been quite heavily built in those days. It came to me that maybe he was able to use the quarry trucks, but as they didn't pass by his front door, I am still baffled on how he got the items down the hill."

Sylvia believes the roof was made of stone. Mary Luty's life story was retold in John Simpson's book of 2003 entitled A History of Edenfield and District. She was a child in the late 1800s.  Her words were also published in A Rossendale Anthology by Ronald Digby in 1967. She recalled how donkeys were used to carry eggs and milk down to the Valley; upon their return they brought needed supplies. She also mentioned families were quite large in that era. It would seem likely that Jonathan and George used a similar method of transportation for obtaining their supplies while living at Scout Moor Bottom farm.

 
   

 

 
 

Sylvia wrote:

"In looking the opposite way from the stone coming down the hillside seen in the background of the picture above, it appears to me that it must have been very bleak in the winter months and the dogs must have had to search for the sheep when gathering. This being a very wet area, I wondered how the bearded sheepdogs ever got dry."

 
       
 

According to Sylvia:

"When standing in front of the house, this is the view Jonathan and George would have seen; the land goes down to a clough where a stream runs all along the bottom."

A clough is another word for gorge or a narrow ravine.

 
       
 

Sylvia Barcroft standing on Back O' Th' Lowe, which is where her great great grandfather moved to from Scout Fold. That land is on the opposite hillside; therefore, it is not on the Scout Moor land.

 

 

 
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