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DATES: Circa dates are designated with a "c." in front of the year. When an artist, photographer, or creator has been identified by name, but the date of the work attributed to that person is unknown, a "d." designation was placed in front of the date representing when the creator died.

 

 

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The date of this photograph is unknown. On the back, it states: "Sheep rustlers beware! The shepherd's dog, "Jack", has been trained to guard these young Suffolk lambs. Moreover, he doesn't welcome unauthorised visitors." This photograph is licensed by the Museum of English Rural Life (MERL) to this website. It is not to be reproduced in any manner without contacting MERL at the University of Reading in order to make arrangements for licensing use.

         

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It is unknown what date this photo was taken. The image stated across the bottom on Line 1: "A Sussex Shepherd On The South Downs Steyning." Line 2: "His Best Companions Innocence & Health And His Best Riches Ignorance Of Wealth" quotes Goldsmith's "The Deserted Village." Goldsmith was an Irish writer, playwright and physician from the 1700s. This photograph is licensed by the Museum of English Rural Life (MERL) to this website. It is not to be reproduced in any manner without contacting MERL at the University of Reading in order to make arrangements for licensing use.

It is interesting to compare the above picture side by side with a picture that has appeared on a postcard done by an artist named Charles T. Howard (1865-1942). He signed his work as C. T. Howard and sold much, if not most, of his artwork for postcard reproduction. The image on the right was published by J. Salmon; no date is known, but it is believed to be in the 1930s.

         

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It is unknown what date this photo was taken in or near Burnham, England. This photo also appeared in The Millennium Book 2000:The Southern Counties Bearded Collie Club, on page 180. This photograph is licensed by the Museum of English Rural Life (MERL) to this website. It is not to be reproduced in any manner without contacting MERL at the University of Reading in order to make arrangements for licensing use.

         

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There appears to be a Beardie-like on the right side of this image.

         

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Another Beardie-like image on a postcard often sold under the name of "On the Watch."

         

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A postcard with the title "Sheep Pass Loch Voil." Look at the right rear side of the sheep. Is that a Beardie-like dog driving the sheep down the path?

         

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A delightful image of Sussex shepherds taking a noon break with a lovely Beardie-like dog.

         

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Image of a shepherd and a Beardie-like dog from a dated postcard of January 22, 1908. It is labeled "A Chilly Morning."

         

?-9

   

A lovely postcard image named "All Scotch."

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