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You are visiting the "Images" page. The other main sections for this site can be accessed by clicking on any one of the above links. Click on any thumbnail image below in the "Links" column to view a larger image. Then click on the "back" button to return to this page. A link appears at the bottom of this page for viewing a second page of miscellaneous images.

Several photographs, postcards, or artwork had too little information available for them to be utilized n the "Shepherds-Farmers" or "History" sections. These images appear below.

DATES: Circa dates are designated with a "c." in front of the year. When an artist, photographer, or creator has been identified by name, but the date of the work attributed to that person is unknown, a "d." designation was placed in front of the date representing when the creator died.

 

Date

 

Link

 

Description

c.1865

   

This rare print reflects what a shepherd in the highlands of Scotland looked like while tending the sheep. The dog is a "collie" type.

         

c.1903

 

 

 

This "PALS" image has appeared on postcards. The earliest known postmark dates back to 1903 (according to Maureen Sale who authored an article printed in the Working Sheepdog News, November/December 1995 issue (No. 6, Vol. 28). A postcard bearing the postmark of 1904 has been submitted to the preparer of this website.

         

c.1903

   

This image has appeared on postcards. One postcard, purchased for use on this website, was postmarked September 29, 1911. However, another copy was sent where a message written on the front had the date of June 15, 1903. That written date is believed to be authentic. Both postcards had the title "Bearded Collies" placed under the image.

         

c.1904

 



 

The sender of this postcard wrote across the bottom "Cockley Hill, Farthinghoe, Brackley, Sept. 1904." This area is in the Northhamptonshire, U.K. area. Stone cottages still exist in Farthinghoe that resemble the one in this picture. A Beardie-like dog was on the lawn. Thanks to assistance from Bridget Howell, this image was able to be placed here.

         

c.1904

   

This postcard was dated in 1904. Thanks to assistance from both E. Gallatly and Bridget Howell, this image was able to be placed here.

         

c.1908

   

It is believed that the South African Church Railway Mission Quarterly Paper was an Anglican entity which published a quarterly paper as early as October 1903. The locations of the entity which put out the publication was listed as London and Edinburgh. This photograph likely demonstrated how a Beardie-like dog assisted in the collection of donations for the Mission's work in South Africa. The image appeared on a postcard with a handwritten date of 1908 on the back. Thanks to assistance from Bridget Howell, this image was able to be placed here.

         

c.1910

 

 

This postcard had a postmark date of April 11, 1910. The dog was named "Phonso."

         

c.1910

   

Bearded Collie. Thanks to Mrs. E. B. Carpenter for providing a copy of this image. She noted on the back "Post Date 1910." The same dog appears on another postcard with a cancellation date of 1913 seen below.

         

c.1913

   

Bearded Collie. From a postcard with a cancellation date of 1913. It appears to be the same dog as the one provided by Mrs. E. B. Carpenter seen above under a c.1910 post date. Thanks to assistance from Bridget Howell, this image was able to be placed here.

         

c.1916

   

Postcard with a postal date of September 1, 1916. Thanks to assistance from Bridget Howell, this image was able to be placed here.

         

c.1938

     

This image (enlarged for the website) was No. 48 from a Second Series of 48 issued by Gallaher, Ltd. Virginia House, London & Belfast. The card states on the back: "SCOTCH BEARDED COLLIE. Here is a venerable breed of Collie that has been worked with sheep in Scotland for generations. His great claim to distinction is the brilliant manner with which he carries off the prizes in field trials and intelligence tests, having a mind as quick on the uptake as can be found in any dog. The Bearded type shown here is less common, but no less characteristic of the breed, which varies a good deal."

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